Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Transfusion reactions in neonates and pediatrics: How and why are they different?

Neonates and children are physically as well as physiologically different from adults. They are immunologically vulnerable, and the effects of transfusion can be longstanding, including with respect to their development. The transfusion reactions in children differ from those in adults in the type of reactions, incidence, and severity. The incidence is more than that in adults for the common type of reactions noted in children. Transfusion reactions are most commonly associated with platelets, followed by plasma and red blood cell transfusions in children. Febrile, allergic, and hypotensive reactions or volume overload are the common types in children. Standardizing pediatric adverse transfusion reaction definitions and criteria are necessary to improve studies and reports. Several modifications are needed to be adapted for transfusing blood products in neonates and children to evade the reactions as much as possible and make transfusion safer in this vulnerable population. This article provides a brief articulation of the transfusion reactions in neonatal and pediatric populations describing how they are different from adults.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app