Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The emerging role for CAR T cells in solid tumor oncology.

In recent years, treatment with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells has revolutionized the outcomes of patients with relapsed or refractory hematological malignancies with long-term remissions in >30% of patients. Similarly, the introduction of immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy changed the therapeutic landscape for several solid malignancies also leading to impressive long-term remission in patients. However, so far CAR T-cell therapy in solid tumors has shown low response rates and especially a lack of long-term remissions. This review focuses on the latest clinical advances and discusses promising results seen with CAR T-cells exploring new target antigens. We then review relevant challenges limiting long-term responses with CAR T-cell therapy in solid tumors like CAR T-cell persistence and target antigen expression. In addition, there is an increasing understanding on T-cell function and dysfunction within the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. This comprises of inhibitory cytokines and checkpoint molecules limiting the killing capacity of CAR T-cells. Finally, we will discuss how this deeper knowledge can be used to develop CAR T-cell therapies overcoming these inhibitory factors and results in CAR T-cell products with higher efficacy and safety. These technological developments will hopefully lead to enhanced clinical activity and improved solid tumor patient outcomes in the near future.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app