Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

miR-22 gene therapy treats HCC by promoting anti-tumor immunity and enhancing metabolism.

MicroRNA-22 (miR-22) can be induced by beneficial metabolites that have metabolic and immune effects, including retinoic acids, bile acids, vitamin D3 , and short-chain fatty acids. The tumor suppressor effects of miR-22 have been suggested, but whether miR-22 treats orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is not established. The role of miR-22 in regulating tumor immunity is poorly understood. Our data showed that miR-22 delivered by adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) effectively treated HCC. Compared with FDA-approved Lenvatinib, miR-22 produced better survival outcomes without noticeable toxicity. miR-22 silenced hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF1α) and enhanced retinoic acid signaling in both hepatocytes and T cells. Moreover, miR-22 treatment improved metabolism and reduced inflammation. In the liver, miR-22 reduced the abundance of IL17-producing T cells and inhibited IL17 signaling by reducing the occupancy of HIF1α in the Rorc and Il17a genes. Conversely, increasing IL17 signaling ameliorated the anti-HCC of miR-22. Additionally, miR-22 expanded cytotoxic T cells and reduced regulatory T cells (Treg). Moreover, depleting cytotoxic T cells also abolished the anti-HCC effects of miR-22. In patients, miR-22 high human HCC had up-regulated metabolic pathways and reduced IL17 pro-inflammatory signaling compared with miR-22 low HCC. Together, miR-22 gene therapy can be a novel option for HCC treatment.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app