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Predictors of Central Vascular Access Device Bloodstream Infections in Patients With Acute Leukemia and Neutropenia: A Retrospective Case-Control Chart Review.

Central vascular access devices (CVADs) are standard for the treatment of leukemia. The objectives of this study were to examine predictors for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and causative microorganisms. A retrospective case/control design was used to examine electronic health records (EHRs) of patients with acute leukemia, a CVAD, and neutropenia. Variables were examined for differences between those who developed bacteremia (cases: n = 10) and those who did not (controls: n = 13). Variables included conditions of health (eg, patient history, laboratory results at the time of nadir, nutritional intake during hospitalization, and CVAD care practices). Fisher exact and Mann-Whitney U tests were used for comparison. Nine organisms were identified, including viridans group streptococci (20%) and Escherichia coli (20%). No statistical differences in variables were found between groups. However, over 50% of the nutritional intake data was missing due to lack of documentation. These findings indicate that further study is needed to examine barriers for electronic documentation. The data collection site found opportunities to improve patient care that included education regarding the daily care of CVADs, collaboration with nutritional services to ensure accurate assessments, and coordination with clinical information systems to improve clinical documentation compliance.

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