JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Artificial Intelligence in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Endoscopy: Advanced Development and New Horizons.

Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a complex chronic immune disease with two subtypes: Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Considering the differences in pathogenesis, etiology, clinical presentation, and response to therapy among patients, gastroenterologists mainly rely on endoscopy to diagnose and treat IBD during clinical practice. However, as exemplified by the increasingly comprehensive ulcerative colitis endoscopic scoring system, the endoscopic diagnosis, evaluation, and treatment of IBD still rely on the subjective manipulation and judgment of endoscopists. In recent years, the use of artificial intelligence (AI) has grown substantially in various medical fields, and an increasing number of studies have investigated the use of this emerging technology in the field of gastroenterology. Clinical applications of AI have focused on IBD pathogenesis, etiology, diagnosis, and patient prognosis. Large-scale datasets offer tremendous utility in the development of novel tools to address the unmet clinical and practice needs for treating patients with IBD. However, significant differences among AI methodologies, datasets, and clinical findings limit the incorporation of AI technology into clinical practice. In this review, we discuss practical AI applications in the diagnosis of IBD via gastroenteroscopy and speculate regarding a future in which AI technology provides value for the diagnosis and treatment of IBD patients.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app