Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Factors affecting intradialytic hepatic oxygenation: Associations between ultrafiltration rate and changes in systemic blood pressure.

INTRODUCTION: Hepato-splanchnic circulation influences the oxygenation of abdominal organs and is important in preventing a reduction in intradialytic blood volume. However, the association between changes in intradialytic hepato-splanchnic circulation and clinical factors remain unknown.

METHODS: We enrolled 91 hemodialysis (HD) patients (20 with intradialytic hypotension (IDH) and 71 without IDH). During HD, hepatic regional oxygen saturation (rSO2 ), a marker of hepatic oxygenation reflecting hepato-splanchnic circulation and oxygenation, was monitored. Changes in hepatic rSO2 at the lowest systolic blood pressure (BP) during HD were analyzed to identify associations with clinical factors.

RESULTS: Hepatic rSO2 levels were 55.8 ± 15.3% before HD and 53.8 ± 14.9% at the lowest systolic BP; therefore, % changes in hepatic rSO2 were -2.7 ± 11.3%. These values were significantly lower in patients with IDH than in those without IDH (-13.8 ± 9.3% vs 0.4 ± 9.8%, p  < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis showed that % changes in hepatic rSO2 were independently associated with % changes in systolic BP (standardized coefficient: 0.416) and ultrafiltration rate (-0.206). Furthermore, % changes in mean BP (0.304) were identified as affecting % changes in hepatic rSO2 instead of those in systolic BP.

CONCLUSIONS: Changes in intradialytic hepatic oxygenation is associated with ultrafiltration rate and changes in systemic BP. Further studies are required to clarify the directionality of the association between changes in hepatic oxygenation and changes in systemic BP during HD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app