COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Comparative polysomnographic study of narcolepsy and idiopathic central nervous system hypersomnia.

Sleep 1986
Patients with a primary diagnosis of narcolepsy or idiopathic CNS hypersomnia seen at Stanford University Sleep Disorders Clinic over a 5-year period were studied retrospectively. The two patient groups were compared with respect to blood pressure, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) psychological profile, nocturnal sleep structure, prevalence and severity of sleep apnea and periodic leg movements in sleep, and daytime sleep tendency. Narcoleptic patients tended to have higher blood pressure, higher prevalence of abnormally elevated MMPI scores, more abbreviated and more disrupted sleep at night, and greater daytime sleep tendency. Sleep apnea and periodic leg movements were more prevalent in narcoleptic patients, but only periodic leg movements in sleep were more prevalent in narcoleptic patients than in the general population. Periodic leg movements during REM sleep were observed in more than one-third of narcoleptic patients, which may be an important pathophysiologic feature of this disorder.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app