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Investigation Of Common Burn Mechanisms, And Training And Safety Conditions In The Workplace.

Workplace burn injuries are associated with significant physical, psychological, and social challenges. This study was designed and conducted to investigate the common burn mechanisms, and training and safety conditions in the workplace. The study is a cross-sectional study that was performed on patients admitted to Shahid Motahari University Hospital in Tehran from August 2016 to October 2017. Samples consisted of patients who suffered burns at work and were able to answer research questions. Data were recorded in tablets by electronic patient registration forms.Of the total burn patients under study, 14.28% were injured in the workplace. The burns were mainly thermal, followed by electrical, chemical, and inhalation burns. 38.2% of patients were not trained for safety measures at work and 27.8% of patients were not given personal protective equipment. 39.0% of workspaces were not safe against the risk of burns. Failure of devices and equipment was the cause of 28.8% of the accidents. Electrical damage, the ignition of flammable materials, gas explosions and contact with molten materials were the most common mechanisms in the occurrence of workplace burns. The lack of awareness by workers, lack of attention to the use of safety equipment at work, and the presence of damaged equipment are the main causes of burn accidents in the workplace. Therefore, the implementation of codified safety training and monitoring the observance of safety measures by workers and employers are recommended.

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