Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Disentangling the determinants of symbiotic species richness in native and invasive gammarids (Crustacea, Amphipoda) of the Baltic region.

Dispersal of alien species is a global problem threatening native biodiversity. Co-introduction of non-native parasites and pathogens adds to the severity of this threat, but this indirect impact has received less attention. To shed light on the key factors determining the richness of microorganisms in native and invasive host species, we compared symbiotic (parasitic and epibiotic) communities of gammarids across different habitats and localities along the Baltic coast of Poland. Seven gammarid species, two native and five invasive, were sampled from 16 freshwater and brackish localities. Sixty symbiotic species of microorganisms of nine phyla were identified. This taxonomically diverse species assemblage of symbionts allowed us to assess the effect of host translocation and regional ecological determinants driving assembly richness in the gammarid hosts. Our results revealed that (i) the current assemblages of symbionts of gammarid hosts in the Baltic region are formed by native and co-introduced species; (ii) species richness of the symbiotic community was higher in the native Gammarus pulex than in the invasive hosts, probably reflecting a process of species loss by invasive gammarids in the new area and the distinct habitat conditions occupied by G. pulex and invasive hosts; (iii) both host species and locality were key drivers shaping assembly composition of symbionts, whereas habitat condition (freshwater versus brackish) was a stronger determinant of communities than geographic distance; (iv) the dispersion patterns of the individual species richness of symbiotic communities were best described by Poisson distributions; in the case of an invasive host, the dispersion of the rich species diversity may switch to a right-skewed negative binomial distribution, suggesting a host-mediated regulation process. We believe this is the first analysis of the symbiotic species richness in native and invasive gammarid hosts in European waters based on original field data and a broad range of taxonomic groups including Microsporidia, Choanozoa, Ciliophora, Apicomplexa, Platyhelminthes, Nematoda, Nematomorha, Acanthocephala and Rotifera, to document the patterns of species composition and distribution.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app