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Evaluation the results of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction with or without using antibiotic solution during graft preparation.

INTRODUCTION: Joint infection after Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction is an uncommon infection which can affect joint movement and function. In this study, the impact of using antibiotic during graft preparation on the results of ACL reconstruction was investigated to examine the negative effects of antibiotic solution on graft and clinical symptoms after the surgery.

METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial study, 80 patients were enrolled. In one group, the graft was placed in vancomycin solution (500 mg of vancomycin powder in 100 ml of normal saline) for 10-15 min during the surgery. In other group, the surgery was performed routinely and the graft was not placed in antibiotic solution. Intravenous antibiotic was given to both groups and they underwent ACL reconstruction surgery through arthroscopic transportal technique using their hamstring tendon. Symptoms and examinations of patients were evaluated for one year after the surgery.

RESULTS: There was no difference between two groups in terms of knee dislocation, knee lock, pain, fever, positivity of Lachman test, Anterior drawer test and pivot-shift test, knee swelling, and movement restriction in flection and extension (P > 0.05). No infection was seen in patients.

CONCLUSIONS: Placing grafts in vancomycin solution does not have negative effects on graft quality and results of ACL surgery.

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