Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Substrate recognition and proton coupling by a bacterial member of solute carrier family 17.

The solute carrier 17 (SLC17) family transports diverse organic anions using two distinct modes of coupling to a source of energy. Transporters that package glutamate and nucleotide into secretory vesicles for regulated release by exocytosis are driven by membrane potential but subject to allosteric regulation by H+ and Cl- . Other SLC17 members including the lysosomal sialic acid exporter couple the flux of organic anion to cotransport of H+ . To begin to understand how similar proteins can perform such different functions, we have studied E. coli DgoT, a H+ /galactonate cotransporter. A recent structure of DgoT showed many residues contacting D-galactonate, and we now find that they do not tolerate even conservative substitutions. In contrast, the closely related lysosomal H+ /sialic acid cotransporter Sialin tolerates similar mutations, consistent with its recognition of diverse substrates with relatively low affinity. We also find that despite coupling to H+ , DgoT transports more rapidly but with lower apparent affinity at high pH. Indeed, membrane potential can drive uptake, indicating electrogenic transport and suggesting a H+ : galactonate stoichiometry >1. Located in a polar pocket of the N-terminal helical bundle, Asp46 and Glu133 are each required for net flux by DgoT, but the E133Q mutant exhibits robust exchange activity and rescues exchange by D46N, suggesting that these two residues operate in series to translocate protons. E133Q also shifts the pH sensitivity of exchange by DgoT, supporting a central role for the highly conserved TM4 glutamate in H+ coupling by DgoT.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app