Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

A study on smartphone dependence and depression in Korean high school students.

Medicine (Baltimore) 2023 March 25
Using the 10th Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey in 2020, we attempted to determine the relationship between smartphone addiction and depression in 25,987 high school students. The demographic characteristics of the subjects were reviewed frequently, and the correlation between smartphone dependence and depression were determined. The results show that it is difficult to track the time spent on smartphones to determine the level of depression (R = 0.143, P < .01), it is difficult concentrating on other tasks due to smartphones (R = 0.140, P < .01), and it is difficult to remove images/data received on smartphones from the head (R = 0.141, P < .01). Further, the impulse to use smartphones is strong (R = 0.157, P < .01), health concerns (r = .124, P < .01) and family conflicts exist due to the use of smartphones (r = .149, P < .01), problems with social relations exist due to the use of smartphones (R = 112, P < .01), and difficulties exist in performing tasks due to the use of smartphones (R = 0.153, P < .01). According to the results of the study, it was determined that there is a relationship between smartphone usage and depression among Korean high school students. The findings from this study can be referenced to help guide the development of smartphone usage parameters for Korean teenagers in depression management programs.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app