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Drug-related causes attributed to acute kidney injury and their documentation in intensive care patients.

PURPOSE: To investigate drug-related causes attributed to acute kidney injury (DAKI) and their documentation in patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU).

METHODS: This study was conducted in an academic hospital in the Netherlands by reusing electronic health record (EHR) data of adult ICU admissions between November 2015 to January 2020. First, ICU admissions with acute kidney injury (AKI) stage 2 or 3 were identified. Subsequently, three modes of DAKI documentation in EHR were examined: diagnosis codes (structured data), allergy module (semi-structured data), and clinical notes (unstructured data).

RESULTS: n total 8124 ICU admissions were included, with 542 (6.7%) ICU admissions experiencing AKI stage 2 or 3. The ICU physicians deemed 102 of these AKI cases (18.8%) to be drug-related. These DAKI cases were all documented in the clinical notes (100%), one in allergy module (1%) and none via diagnosis codes. The clinical notes required the highest time investment to analyze.

CONCLUSIONS: Drug-related causes comprise a substantial part of AKI in the ICU patients. However, current unstructured DAKI documentation practice via clinical notes hampers our ability to gain better insights about DAKI occurrence. Therefore, both automating DAKI identification from the clinical notes and increasing structured DAKI documentation should be encouraged.

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