Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique versus spray and stretch technique in neck pain patients with upper trapezius trigger points: a randomized clinical trial.

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate the difference between the integrated neuromuscular inhibition technique (INIT) and spray and stretch technique in patients with neck pain and upper trapezius active trigger points. Methods: A convenience sample of 60 patients with neck pain and active trigger points were recruited from physiotherapy students and allocated randomly to three groups INIT plus stretching exercise spray and stretch technique plus stretching exercise, and stretching exercise only. Treatment was three times per week for four weeks. Pain intensity by visual analogue scale (VAS), pain pressure threshold (PPT), neck disability by Arabic neck disability index (ANDI), and muscle amplitude in the form of root mean square (RMS) by electromyography (EMG) were measured at baseline and after four weeks. Results: Between groups analysis; the results revealed statistical significant difference between three groups after four weeks of intervention as p  =0.0001. Within the group analysis, post hoc tests reported improvement at all variables in both INIT and spray and stretch technique groups with mean differences 64.5 and 65.1 in VAS, 20 and 18.15 in ANDI, -1.45 and -0.81 in PPT, and 2.47 and 1.88 in muscle amplitude, respectively. But there was no statistically significant difference in stretching only group in all variables except VAS.

CONCLUSION: Both INIT and spray and stretch techniques had a clinical and statistical effects on pain, function, PPT, and RMS. According to results, there were statistical significant differences between INIT and spray and stretch groups at post-treatment in all variables except VAS with more favor to INIT group, but there were no clinical differences between INIT and spray and stretch groups.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app