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Risk factors for pressure ulcer recurrence following surgical reconstruction: A cross-sectional retrospective analysis.

Many studies on the recurrence of pressure ulcers after surgical reconstruction have focused on surgical techniques and socioeconomic factors. Herein, we aimed to identify the risk factors of the associated comorbidities for pressure ulcer recurrence. We enrolled 147 patients who underwent pressure ulcer reconstruction and were followed up for more than three years. The recurrence of pressure ulcers was defined as recurrent pressure ulcers with stage 3/4 pressure ulcers. We reviewed and analyzed systematic records of medical histories, including sex, age, associated comorbidities such as spinal cord injury (SCI), diabetes mellitus (DM), coronary artery disease, cerebral vascular accident, end-stage renal disease, scoliosis, dementia, Parkinson's disease, psychosis, autoimmune diseases, hip surgery, and locations of the primary pressure ulcer. Patients with recurrent pressure ulcers were younger than those without. Patients with SCI and scoliosis had higher odds, while those with Parkinson's disease had lower odds of recurrence of pressure ulcers than those without these comorbidities. Moreover, the decision tree algorithm identified that SCI, DM, and age < 34 years could be risk factor classifiers for predicting recurrent pressure ulcers. This study demonstrated that age and SCI are the two most important risk factors associated with recurrent pressure ulcers following surgical reconstruction.

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