Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Can we consider ventriculo-gallbladder shunt a first-line treatment in selected patients? Case report of a successful management.

INTRODUCTION: Ventriculo-gallbladder shunt (VGS) has been recognized as a last-resort alternative to treat hydrocephalus when the peritoneum and/or other distal sites can no longer receive shunts. In some specific conditions, it may be conceded as a first-line treatment.

CASE PRESENTATION: We report the case of a 6-month-old girl with progressive post-hemorrhagic hydrocephalus who presented a concomitant chronic abdominal symptom. Specific investigations ruled out acute infection and led to the diagnosis of chronic appendicitis. Both problems were managed in a one-stage salvage procedure consisting of laparotomy sanctioning to treat the abdominal pathology and seize the opportunity to perform a VGS as a first option since the abdomen is prone to ventriculoperitoneal shunt (VPS) failure.

CONCLUSION: Only few cases have reported the use of VGS as the first option to handle uncommon complex cases due to abdominal or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) conditions. We wish to draw attention to VGS as an effective procedure not only in children with multiple shunt failures but also as first-line management in some selected cases.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app