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The effect of statins on bone turnover biomarkers: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Endocrine Journal 2023 March 16
Few studies have considered the effect of statins on bone turnover biomarker levels and the results of these studies are inconsistent. Here we performed a meta-analysis of the effect of statins on bone turnover biomarker levels. We used keywords, free words, and related words that included the terms "hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors," "statin," and "bone turnover biomarkers" to search PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase. The Cochrane Risk Bias Evaluation Tool was used to evaluate the risk of bias, and Review Manager 5.3 and Stata 13.0 were used for statistical analyses. Six randomized controlled trials involving a total of 382 subjects were included in the meta-analysis. The results showed that statins increased the osteocalcin (OC) [mean difference (MD) = 0.73 ng/mL, 95% CI: 0.12, 1.35, I2 = 23% and p = 0.26], and decreased cross-linked N-telopeptide (NTX) (MD = -1.14 nM BCE, 95% CI: -2.21, -0.07, I2 = 0%, p = 0.53) and C-terminal peptide of type I collagen (CTX) (MD = -0.03 ng/mL, 95% CI: -0.05, -0.01, I2 = 0% and p = 0.56). There was no effect on bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (MD = -1.37 U/L, 95% CI: -3.09, 0.34, I2 = 0% and p = 0.94) and intact parathyroid hormone (MD = -1.73 pg/mL, 95% CI: -4.35, 0.89, I2 = 0% and p = 0.77). Statins increase bone formation biomarker OC and decrease bone resorption biomarker NTX and CTX levels.

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