Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

PRMT5/FGFR3/AKT Signaling Axis Facilitates Lung Cancer Cell Metastasis.

Objectives: This study aims to investigate the function of the protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5) and fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3)/Akt signaling axis in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of human lung cancer. Methods: The mRNA and protein expression levels of PRMT5, FGFR3, p-Akt, and EMT markers are determined by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively; the expression and localization of PRMT5, p-Akt, and proliferating cell nuclear antigen are detected by immunofluorescence; the human lung cancer cell proliferation is measured by MTS assay. Results: PRMT5 and FGFR3 are highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and are closely related to lymphatic metastasis. Moreover, down-regulation of PRMT5 by lentivirus-mediated shRNAs or inhibition of PRMT5 by specific inhibitors attenuates FGFR3 expression, Akt phosphorylation, and lung cancer cell proliferation. Further studies show that silencing PRMT5 impairs EMT-related markers, including vimentin, collagen I, and β-catenin. Conversely, ectopic expression of PRMT5 increases FGFR3 expression, Akt phosphorylation, and EMT-related markers, suggesting that PRMT5 regulates metastasis probably through the FGFR3/Akt signaling axis. Conclusion: PRMT5/FGFR3/Akt signaling axis controls human lung cancer progression and metastasis and also implies that PRMT5 may serve as a prognostic biomarker and therapeutic candidate for treating lung cancer.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app