Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Do associated proximal fibula fractures help predict the severity of tibial plateau fractures?

PURPOSE: Proximal fibula fractures are often associated with tibial plateau fractures, but their relationship is poorly characterized. The purpose of this study was to better define the relationship between tibial plateau injury severity and presence of associated soft tissue injuries.

METHODS: A retrospective review was performed on all operatively treated tibial plateau fractures at a Level 1 trauma center over a 5-year period. Patient demographics, injury radiographs, CT scans, operative reports and follow-up were reviewed.

RESULTS: Queried tibial plateau fractures from 2014 to 2019 totaled 217 fractures in 215 patients. Fifty-two percent were classified as AO/OTA 41B and 48% were AO/OTA 41C. Thirty-nine percent had an associated proximal fibula fracture. The presence of a proximal fibula fracture had significant correlation with AO/OTA 41C fractures, as compared with AO/OTA 41B fractures (chi-square, p < 0.001). Of the patients with a lateral split depression type tibial plateau fracture, the presence of a proximal fibula fracture was associated with more articular comminution, measured by number of articular fragments (mean = 4.0 vs. 2.9 articular fragments, p = 0.004). There was also a higher rate of meniscal injury in patients with proximal fibula fractures (37% vs. 20%, p = 0.003).

CONCLUSIONS: There was a significant relationship between the higher energy tibial plateau fracture type (AO/OTA 41C) and the presence of an associated proximal fibula fracture. The presence of a proximal fibula fracture with a tibial plateau fracture is an indicator of a higher energy injury and a higher likelihood of meniscal injury.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app