Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
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Cardiovascular and Perceptual Responses to Resistance Training with Practical Blood Flow Restriction Induced by a Non-Elastic Band vs. Pneumatic Cuff: A Crossover Randomized Study.

Our purpose in this study was to analyze perceptual and cardiovascular responses in low-load resistance training (RT) sessions associated with a fixed non-elastic band compressed to the proximal region of the arms (p-BFR) versus a pneumatic cuff inflated to a pressure of 150 mmHg (t-BFR). Participants (16 healthy trained men) were randomly assigned to two conditions of low-load RT (20% one repetition maximum [1RM]) with BFR (p-BFR or t-BFR). In both conditions, the participants performed five exercises (4 sets/30-15-15-15) for the upper-limbs, but in one of the conditions, the exercises were performed with a p-BFR induced by a non-elastic band, while in the other, the exercises were performed with a t-BFR using a device with similar width. The devices used to generate the BFR had similar widths (5 cm). Brachial blood pressure (bBP) and heart rate (HR) were measured before, after each exercise and after the experimental session (5-, 10-, 15-, and 20 min post-session). Rating of perceived exertion (RPE) and rating of pain perception (RPP) were reported after each exercise and 15 minutes post-session. HR increased during the training session in both conditions, with no differences between p-BFR and t-BFR. Neither intervention increased diastolic BP (DBP) during training, but there was a significant post-session reduction in DBP in the p-BFR, with no differences observed between conditions. There were no significant differences in RPE and RPP in the two training conditions, with both conditions associated with higher RPE and RPP at the end versus beginning of the experimental session. We conclude that when BFR device width and material are similar, low-load training with t-BFR and p-BFR promotes similar acute perceptual and cardiovascular responses in healthy trained men.

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