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Clinical features and factors related to lifetime suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in patients who have had substance-induced psychosis across their lifetime.

Psychiatry Research 2023 March 7
Suicidal behaviors are common among patients with substance use disorders (SUD). However, the prevalence and clinical factors related to suicide behaviors among patients who have had substance-induced psychosis (SIP) is unknown. This study aims to explore the prevalence, clinical features, and factors related to lifetime suicidal ideation (SI) and suicide attempts (SA) in patients who have had SIP across their lifetime. A cross-sectional study was conducted in an outpatient center for addiction treatment between 01/01/2010 and 12/31/2021. 601 patients were evaluated with validated scales and questionnaires (79.03% males; M age 38.11±10.11 years). The prevalence of SI and SA was 55.4% and 33.6%, respectively. SI was independently related to any type of lifetime abuse, depressive spectrum disorders, benzodiazepine use disorder, borderline personality disorder, and the level of depressive symptoms. SA was independently associated with lifetime physical abuse, benzodiazepine use disorder, the number of psychotic symptoms, borderline personality disorder, and the level of depressive symptoms. The main factors related to SI and SA in those patients should be evaluated in daily clinical practice and considered in any approach to clinical practice as well as in health policies targeting suicide prevention.

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