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Genital tuberculosis, infertility and assisted reproduction.

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The goal of this review is to familiarize a global readership on the subtilities of clinical presentation and the mayhem that a missed diagnosis of genital tuberculosis (GTB) is capable of inflicting on the health and wellbeing of infertile women with untreated GTB attempting to conceive with assisted reproductive technology (ART).

RECENT FINDINGS: Emerging and recent literature relating to the epidemiology and clinical presentation of GTB and reporting of unique risks of ART for maternal and fetal morbidity in untreated cases of GTB are reviewed. Evidence relating to a broadening spectrum of screening methodologies for GTB detection of GTB is additionally considered.

SUMMARY: Genital TB must be considered as a mechanism for couple's infertility in at-risk populations. Attempting to treat female GTB-related infertility with in-vitro fertilization poses unique and potentially life-threatening risks, both to the mother and to the conceptus; these risks can be avoided through vigilance, appropriate screening and timely treatment prior to proceeding with IVF.

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