Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Inherited pain hypersensitivity and increased anxiety-like behaviors are associated with genetic epilepsy in Wistar Audiogenic Rats: Short- and long-term effects of acute and chronic seizures on nociception and anxiety.

Anxiety and pain hypersensitivity are neurobehavioral comorbidities commonly reported by patients with epilepsies, and preclinical models are suitable to investigate the neurobiology of behavioral and neuropathological alterations associated with these epilepsy-related comorbidities. This work aimed to characterize endogenous alterations in nociceptive threshold and anxiety-like behaviors in the Wistar Audiogenic Rat (WAR) model of genetic epilepsy. We also assessed the effects of acute and chronic seizures on anxiety and nociception. WARs from acute and chronic seizure protocols were divided into two groups to assess short- and long-term changes in anxiety (1 day or 15 days after seizures, respectively). To assess anxiety-like behaviors, the laboratory animals were submitted to the open field, light-dark box, and elevated plus maze tests. The von Frey, acetone, and hot plate tests were used to measure the endogenous nociception in seizure-free WARs, and postictal antinociception was recorded at 10, 30, 60, 120, 180 min, and 24 h after seizures. Seizure-free WARs presented increased anxiety-like behaviors and pain hypersensitivity, displaying mechanical and thermal allodynia (to heat and cold stimuli) in comparison to nonepileptic Wistar rats. Potent postictal antinociception that persisted for 120 to 180 min was detected after acute and chronic seizures. Additionally, acute and chronic seizures have magnified the expression of anxiety-like behaviors when assessed at 1 day and 15 days after seizures. Behavioral analysis indicated more severe and persistent anxiogenic-like alterations in WARs submitted to acute seizures. Therefore, WARs presented pain hypersensitivity and increased anxiety-like behaviors endogenously associated with genetic epilepsy. Acute and chronic seizures induced postictal antinociception in response to mechanical and thermal stimuli and increased anxiety-like behaviors when assessed 1 day and 15 days later. These findings support the presence of neurobehavioral alterations in subjects with epilepsy and shed light on the use of genetic models to characterize neuropathological and behavioral alterations associated with epilepsy.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app