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The effect of lighted toy on reducing pain and fear during blood collection in children between 3 and 6 years: A randomized control trial.

BACKGROUND: This study was carried out as an experimental research to determine the effect of the light toy on reducing pain and fear during blood collection in children.

METHODS: The data were obtained 116 children. The "Interview and Observation Form Children's Fear Scale, Wong-Baker Faces, Luminous Toy and Stopwatch" was used for data collection. The data were evaluated using percentage, mean, standard deviation, chi-square, t-test, correlation analysis and Krusskal Wallis test in SPSS 21.0 package program.

FINDINGS: The fear score average of the children in the lighted toy group was 0.95 ± 0.80, while it was 3.00 ± 0.74 in the control group. The difference between the groups in terms of the fear score average of the children was found statistically significant (p < 0.05). When the difference between groups in terms of pain status of children is examined, the pain level of children in the lighted toy group (2.83 ± 2.82,) was found to be significantly lower than the pain level of the children in the control group (5.86 ± 2.72) (p < 0.05).

DISCUSSION: As a result of the study, it was found that the lighted toy given to the children during blood collection reduces their fear and pain levels. In the light of these findings, it is recommended to increase the use of lighted toys in blood collection.

APPLICATION TO PRACTICE: The use of lighted toys as a distraction method during blood collection in children is an effective, easy-to-access and low-cost method. This method demonstrates that there is no need for expensive methods of distraction.

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