Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Acceptability of a peer-led self-management program for people living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in regional Southern Tasmania in Australia: A qualitative study.

Chronic Illness 2023 March 10
OBJECTIVES: People living with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in regional communities experience a higher disease burden and have poorer access to support services. This study sought to investigate the acceptability of a peer-led self-management program (SMP) in regional Tasmania, Australia.

METHODS: This descriptive qualitative study, underpinned by interpretivism used semi-structured one-to-one interviews to gather data to explore COPD patients' views of peer-led SMPs. Purposeful sampling recruited a sample of 8 women and 2 men. Data was analysed using a thematic approach.

RESULTS: The three final themes, 'Normality and Living with the disease', a 'Platform for sharing' and 'Communication mismatch' suggest that peer-led SMPs could offer an opportunity to share experiences. The themes also suggest that COPD often manifested as a deviation from 'normal life'. Communication was often felt to be ambiguous leading to tension between the health experts and people living with the condition.

DISCUSSION: Peer-led SMP has the potential to provide the much-needed support for people living with COPD in regional communities. This will ensure that they are empowered to live with the condition with dignity and respect. Benefits of exchanging ideas and socialisation should not be ignored and may enhance sustainability of SMPs.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app