Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Patient characteristics in sepsis-related deaths: prevalence of advanced frailty, comorbidity, and age in a Norwegian hospital trust.

Infection 2023 March 10
OBJECTIVE: To examine the prevalence of advanced frailty, comorbidity, and age among sepsis-related deaths in an adult hospital population.

METHODS: Retrospective chart reviews of deceased adults within a Norwegian hospital trust, with a diagnosis of infection, over 2 years (2018-2019). The likelihood of sepsis-related death was evaluated by clinicians as sepsis-related, possibly sepsis-related, or not sepsis-related.

RESULTS: Of 633 hospital deaths, 179 (28%) were sepsis-related, and 136 (21%) were possibly sepsis-related. Among these 315 patients whose deaths were sepsis-related or possibly sepsis-related, close to three in four patients (73%) were either 85 years or older, living with severe frailty (Clinical Frailty Scale, CFS, score of 7 or more), or an end-stage condition prior to the admission. Among the remaining 27%, 15% were either 80-84 years old, living with frailty corresponding to a CFS score of 6, or severe comorbidity, defined as 5 points or more on the Charlson Comorbidity Index (CCI). The last 12% constituted the presumably healthiest cluster, but in this group as well, the majority died with limitations of care due to their premorbid functional status and/ or comorbidity. Findings remained stable if the population was limited to sepsis-related deaths on clinicians' reviews or those fulfilling the Sepsis-3 criteria.

CONCLUSIONS: Advanced frailty, comorbidity, and age were predominant in hospital fatalities where infection contributed to death, with or without sepsis. This is of importance when considering sepsis-related mortality in similar populations, the applicability of study results to everyday clinical work, and future study designs.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app