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The role of psychological factors in functional gastrointestinal disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

PURPOSE: To systematically reevaluate the role of psychological factors in functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) and thus provide a scientific basis for the psychological treatment of FGIDs.

METHODS: A literature search was conducted using the PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases from January 2018 to August 2022 for researches on psychological factors affecting patients with functional gastrointestinal disorders. Meta-analysis was carried out with Stata17.0 after the screening, extraction, and evaluation of article quality.

RESULTS: The search included 22 articles with 2430 patients in the FGIDs group and 12,397 patients in the healthy controls. Meta-analysis showed anxiety [(pooled SMD = 0.74, 95%CI: 0.62 ~ 0.86, p < 0.000) (pooled OR = 3.14, 95%CI: 2.47 ~ 4.00, p < 0.000)], depression [(pooled SMD = 0.79, 95%CI: 0.63 ~ 0.95, p < 0.000) (pooled OR = 3.09, 95%CI: 2.12 ~ 4.52, p < 0.000)], mental disorders (pooled MD =  -5.53, 95%CI: -7.12 ~  -3.95, p < 0.05), somatization (pooled SMD = 0.92, 95%CI: 0.61 ~ 1.23, p < 0.000), and sleep disorders (pooled SMD = 0.69, 95%CI: 0.04 ~ 1.34, p < 0.05) are risk factors for functional gastrointestinal disorders.

CONCLUSION: There is a significant association between psychological factors and FGIDs. Interventions such as anti-anxiety drugs, antidepressants, and behavioral therapy are of great clinical significance in reducing FGIDs risk and improving prognosis.

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