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Outcomes of Laser-Assisted Closure (SiLaC) Surgery for Chronic Pilonidal Sinus Disease.

Background: Management of pilonidal sinus (PNS) disease has changed notably in the past decade, with the introduction of novel surgical techniques and technological innovation. In this study, we summarized our initial experience with sinus laser-assisted closure (SiLaC) of pilonidal disease. Methods: A retrospective analysis of a prospective database of all patients who underwent minimally invasive surgery combined with laser therapy for PNS between September 2018 and December 2020 was performed. Patients' demographics, clinical and perioperative data, as well postoperative outcomes were recorded and analyzed. Results: A total of 92 patients (86 males, 93.4%) underwent SiLaC surgery for pilonidal sinus disease during the study period. Patients' median age was 22 (range 16-62 years), and 60.8% of them previously underwent abscess drainage due to PNS. SiLaC was performed under local anesthesia in 85.7% of cases (78 patients) with a median energy of 1081 J (range 13-5035 J). One patient was lost to follow-up, leaving 91 patients for final analysis. The primary outcome was complete healing rate, standing at 81.3% (74/91 patients). In 8 patients (8.8%), there was minor incomplete healing that did not require reintervention. Recurrent/nonhealing disease was seen in 9 patients (9.9%), requiring reoperation in 7 patients (8.4%). Of those, 4 patients underwent repeat SiLaC and 3 patients underwent wide excision. Analysis of risk factors for PNS recurrence demonstrated that general anesthesia ( P  = .02) was associated with increased risk for recurrence along with a trend for increased risk in patients with significant hairiness ( P  = .078). No differences were seen in age ( P  = .621), gender ( P  = .475), median sinus length ( P  = .397), and energy used ( P  = .904). Conclusion: Primary healing rate after SiLaC surgery for chronic PNS was >80% in our series. Ten percent of patients did not achieve complete healing but did not require surgery due to lack of symptoms.

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