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The possible effect of lycopene in ameliorating experimentally induced ulcerative colitis in adult male albino rats (A histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural study).

Ulcerative colitis (UC) is considered a long-term inflammatory disorder worldwide. Its pathogenesis is associated with reduced antioxidant capacity. Lycopene (LYC) is a powerful antioxidant with strong free radical scavenging property. The present work has done to assess changes of colonic mucosa in induced UC and the possible ameliorative effects of LYC. Forty-five adult male albino rats were randomly divided into four groups: group I (control), group II was given 5 mg/kg/day (LYC) by oral gavage for 3 weeks. Group III (UC) was received single intra-rectal injection of acetic acid. Group IV (LYC+UC) received LYC in same dose and duration as before and acetic acid on 14th day of the experiment. UC group showed loss of surface epithelium with destructed crypts. Congested blood vessels with heavy cellular infiltration were observed. Significant decrease in goblet cell numbers and the mean area percentage of ZO-1 immunoexpression were noticed. Significant increase in the mean area percentage of collagen and the mean area percentage of COX-2 were also noticed. Ultrastructural changes were matched with light microscopic results that showed abnormal destructive columnar and goblet cells. Histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural findings in group IV supported the ameliorative role of LYC against destructive changes induced by UC.

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