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Feasibility of Laparoscopic Fundoplication Without Removing the Preceding Gastrostomy in Severely Neurologically Impaired Patients: A Multicenter Evaluation of the Traction Technique.

Purpose: Severely neurologically impaired patients sometimes require anti-reflux surgery with preceding gastrostomy. We apply a traction technique for laparoscopic fundoplication (LF) without gastrostomy takedown (GTD) in such cases. We conducted a multicenter review to assess the feasibility of our approach. Materials and Methods: In brief, the traction technique involves left-lateral-traction of the stomach body, right-lateral-traction of the round ligament of the liver, and elevation of the left liver lobe to create a sufficient field for manipulating the forceps. Patients who underwent LF with Nissen's procedures in 2010-2022 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were analyzed by a one-way analysis of variance. Results: The operative approaches included the traction technique ( n  = 16; Group 1), GTD and reconstruction ( n  = 5; Group 2), and LF followed by gastrostomy ( n  = 92; Group 3). In comparison with Group 1, significant differences were only found in pneumoperitoneum time (Group 1 versus Group 2 versus Group 3: 174.4 minutes versus 250.4 minutes versus 179.5 minutes; P  = .0179). Operating time (222.7 minutes versus 303.0 minutes versus 239.7 minutes; P  = .0743), duration to full-strength enteral nutrition (10.4 days versus 17.2 days versus 11.0 days; P  = .0806), and length of hospital stay (17.2 days versus 31.0 days versus 18.5 days; P  = .3247) were equivalent. No re-fundoplication was required in Group 1. Conclusion: The traction technique secures the operative quality and outcome of LF without GTD.

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