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Risk Factors for Poor Prognosis in Acute Coronary Syndrome Admitted in the Emergency Department: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

Heart Surgery Forum 2023 Februrary 11
BACKGROUND: In the present study, we aimed to identify risk factors of poor prognosis for patients with acute coronary syndrome in the emergency department.

METHODS: The study included 2667 patients, who were admitted to the Emergency Department of Chest Pain Center, Fujian Provincial Hospital, due to chest pain from January 1, 2017 to March 31, 2020. Logistic regression was used to identify factors of poor prognosis for patients with ACS in the ED. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was plotted to assess the performance of the multivariate logistic regression model. Subgroup analysis was used to analyze the difference of SBP in ACS patients with different characteristics.

RESULTS: The final analysis included 2667 patients, of whom 2,057 patients (77.8%) had poor prognosis. STEMI (compared with UA) (OR=20.139; 95% CI:12.448-32.581; P < 0.001), NSTEMI (compared with UA) (OR=7.430; 95% CI:5.159-10.700; P < 0.001), respiratory rate ≥20 bpm (compared with <20 bpm) (OR=1.334; 95% CI: 1.060-1.679; P = 0.014), and use of antiplatelets (OR=1.557; 95% CI:1.181-2.053; P = 0.002) was associated with increased likelihood of poor prognosis for ACS patients in ED. SBP ≥140 mmHg (compared with<140mmHg) (OR=0.574; 95% CI: 0.477-0.690; P < 0.001) was associated with decreased likelihood of poor prognosis for ACS patients in the ED. The area under curve (AUC) of the predictive efficacy of logistic regression model was 0.825 (95% CI: 0.795-0.833, P < 0.001).

CONCLUSION: This study found that STEMI, NSTEMI, respiratory rate ≥20 bpm, and use of antiplatelets were associated with increased likelihood of poor prognosis for ACS patients in the ED. It also found that SBP≥140 was associated with decreased likelihood of poor prognosis. Our study may be useful for doctors to make clinical decisions for ACS patients.

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