Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Alteration in the Cross-sectional Area (CSA) Ratio of the Paraspinal Muscles following Vertebral Insufficiency Fractures.

Background  Vertebral insufficiency fractures in the elderly are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Early diagnosis is essential to direct patient-specific rehabilitation. Aims  We hypothesize that in patients with vertebral insufficiency fractures, there is atrophy of the psoas and paraspinal muscles with alteration in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of the muscles. Materials and Methods  Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies for 100 consecutive patients, older than 60 years presenting with lower back pain, were included in the study. For each MRI study, the CSA of the psoas and paraspinal muscles (multifidus) at the level of L4/5-disc space was measured to calculate the cross-sectional area ratio (CSAR) by two readers. One reader repeated the measurements after an interval of 2 weeks. We divided the patients ( n  = 100) into various groups based on the number of vertebral fractures. Results  In total, 77 patients with vertebral body fractures (48 with one, 16 with two and 13 with more than two fractures) were identified with a mean age of 73 (range 60-92) years. The ratio of multifidus CSA to psoas CSA was calculated with mean values of each group (1-4) as 2.56, 1.89, 2.09 and 2.16, respectively. There was statistically significance difference of the CSAR between the cohorts ( p -value = 0.0115). Conclusion  Vertebral insufficiency fractures in the elderly are associated not only with atrophy of psoas and the multifidus group of muscles as evident by the CSA values, but they also affect the CSAR depending on the number of fractures. This finding may help to direct targeted patient-specific physiotherapy rehabilitation and interventions to prevent further such fractures.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app