Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on atrial remodeling and diastolic dysfunction of patients with obstructive sleep apnea and metabolic syndrome: a randomized study.

Obesity 2023 Februrary 29
OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) treatment on heart remodeling and diastolic dysfunction in patients with metabolic syndrome (MS).

METHODS: This study is a prespecified analysis of a randomized placebo-controlled trial that enrolled patients with a recent diagnosis of MS and moderate-to-severe OSA to undergo continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) or nasal dilators (placebo) for 6 months. Patients were invited to perform a transthoracic echocardiogram by a single investigator blinded to treatment assignment.

RESULTS: A total of 99 (79% men; mean [SD], age: 48 [9] years; BMI: 33 [4] kg/m2 ) completed the study. At follow-up, in the placebo group, patients had a significant increase in atrial diameter: from 39.5 (37.0-43.0) mm to 40.5 (39.0-44.8) mm (p = 0.003). CPAP prevented atrial enlargement: from 40.0 (38.0-44.0) to 40.0 (39.0-45.0) mm (p = 0.194). In patients with diastolic dysfunction at baseline, almost half had diastolic dysfunction reversibility with CPAP (in comparison with only two patients in the placebo group, p = 0.039). In the regression analysis, the chance of diastolic dysfunction reversibility by CPAP was 6.8-fold (95% CI: 1.48-50.26, p = 0.025) compared with placebo.

CONCLUSIONS: In patients with MS and OSA, 6 months of CPAP therapy prevented atrial remodeling and increased the chance of diastolic dysfunction reversibility.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app