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Effects of sesamin on Aβ 1-42 -induced oxidative stress and LTP impairment in a rat model of Alzheimer's disease.

Metabolic Brain Disease 2023 Februrary 28
The present study examined the protective effect of sesamin (Ses) on β-amyloid (Aβ)-induced long-term potentiation (LTP) impairment at the PP-DG synapses in male rats. Wistar rats were randomly assigned to seven groups: control, sham, Aβ; ICV Aβ1-42 microinjection, Ses, Aβ + Ses; first, ICV Aβ injections and then receiving Ses, Ses + Aβ: four weeks of pretreatment with Ses and then Aβ injection, and Ses + Aβ + Ses: pre (four weeks) and post (four weeks) treatment with Ses. Ses-treated groups received 30 mg/kg of Ses once a day by oral gavage for four weeks. After the treatment period, the animals were positioned in a stereotaxic device for surgery and field potential recording. The population spike (PS) amplitude and slope of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSP) were evaluated in the DG region. Serum oxidative stress biomarkers (total oxidant status (TOS) and total antioxidant capacity (TAC)) were measured. Aβ impaired LTP induction at the PP-DG synapses evidenced by a decrease in EPSP slope and PS amplitude of LTP. In Aβ rats, Ses increased EPSP slope and PS amplitude of LTP in the DG granular cells. Also, an increase in TOS and a reduction in TAC caused by Aβ were significantly corrected by Ses. Ses could prevent Aβ-induced LTP impairment at the PP-DG synapses in male rats, which can be due to its preventive effects on oxidative stress.

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