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Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of cerebrolysin and/or lithium in the male Wistar rat model of Parkinson's disease induced by reserpine.

Metabolic Brain Disease 2023 Februrary 28
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease worldwide and represents a challenge for clinicians. The present study aims to investigate the effects of cerebrolysin and/or lithium on the behavioral, neurochemical and histopathological alterations induced by reserpine as a model of PD. The rats were divided into control and reserpine-induced PD model groups. The model animals were further divided into four subgroups: rat PD model, rat PD model treated with cerebrolysin, rat PD model treated with lithium and rat PD model treated with a combination of cerebrolysin and lithium. Treatment with cerebrolysin and/or lithium ameliorated most of the alterations in oxidative stress parameters, acetylcholinesterase and monoamines in the striatum and midbrain of reserpine-induced PD model. It also ameliorated the changes in nuclear factor-kappa and improved the histopathological picture induced by reserpine. It could be suggested that cerebrolysin and/or lithium showed promising therapeutic potential against the variations induced in the reserpine model of PD. However, the ameliorating effects of lithium on the neurochemical, histopathological and behavioral alterations induced by reserpine were more prominent than those of cerebrolysin alone or combined with lithium. It can be concluded that the antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects of both drugs played a significant role in their therapeutic potency.

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