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A retrospective study to examine the association of different pear-shaped balloons with efficacy and postoperative complications in percutaneous balloon compression for trigeminal neuralgia.

Neurosurgical Review 2023 Februrary 28
Percutaneous balloon compression is a safe and effective therapeutic modality for trigeminal neuralgia. It is widely recognized that the pear-shaped balloon is the key to the success of the procedure. This study aimed to analyze the effect of different pear-shaped balloons on the duration of the treatment outcome. In addition, the relationship between individual variables and the duration and severity of complications was analyzed. The clinical data and intraoperative radiographs of 132 patients with trigeminal neuralgia were reviewed. We classify pear-shaped balloons into type A, type B, and type C balloons depending on the size of their heads. The collected variables were correlated with prognosis by univariate and multivariate analyses. The efficiency of the procedure was 96.9%. There was no significant difference in pain relief rates between the different pear-shaped balloons. Median pain-free survival time was longer for type B and C balloons, which were significantly different from type A balloons. In addition, pain duration also was a risk factor for recurrence. There was no significant difference in the duration of numbness between the different types of pear-shaped balloons, but type C balloons resulted in longer-lasting masticatory muscle weakness. Duration of compression and balloon shape can also significantly influence the severity of complications. Different pear-shaped balloons have been shown to have a significant effect on the efficacy and complications of the PBC procedure, with type B balloons (head ratio: 10-20%) appearing to be the ideal pear shape. However, its clinical application remains to be validated.

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