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The Nasal Innate Immune Proteome After Saline Irrigation: A Pilot Study in Healthy Individuals.

BACKGROUND: Previous research has shown diminished nasal immune function following nasal saline irrigation (NSI), returning to baseline at 6 hours. The aim of this study was to examine the immune nasal proteome before and after 14 days of nasal irrigation.

METHODS: Seventeen healthy volunteers received either isotonic (IsoSal) or low salt (LowNa) NSI. Nasal secretions were collected before and 30 min after NSI at baseline and again after 14 days. Specimens were analyzed using mass spectrometry to detect proteins of relevance to nasal immune function.

RESULTS: One thousand eight hundred and sixty-five proteins were identified with significant changes in 71 proteins, of which 23 were identified as part of the innate immune system. Baseline analysis demonstrated an increase of 9 innate proteins after NSI, most after IsoSal. After 14 days, a greater increase in innate peptides was present, with most now in the LowNa group. When NSI solutions were compared, a significant increase in 4 innate proteins, including a 211% in lysozyme, was detected in the LowNa group.

CONCLUSION: LowNa NSI demonstrates evidence of improving the innate immune secretions, especially lysozyme, in healthy volunteers.

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