Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Transmission of negative biases through social commentary included in neonatal intensive care unit progress notes.

OBJECTIVE: To determine how the perception of families elicited after reading progress note social commentary differs by patient race.

STUDY DESIGN: We retrospectively performed content analysis of social commentary in physician progress notes for neonatal intensive care unit patients hospitalized from 2018-2019. Neonatologists blinded to patient race rated how commentary impacted their perception of the patient's family on a 5-point Likert scale. Frequency of negative ratings was compared across reported race using chi-squared tests.

RESULTS: We reviewed charts of 460 neonates. In total, 225 (49%) contained social commentary beyond parents' names. Twelve neonatologists rated how commentaries impacted their perception of the patient's family; 79%, 18%, and 3% were rated neutrally, negatively, and positively, respectively. Frequency of negative ratings was significantly greater among American Indian/Alaska Native than other patients (35% vs. 22%, p < 0.001).

CONCLUSIONS: Physician documentation of social commentary in patient notes may reflect and perpetuate implicit biases that contribute to race-based healthcare disparities.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app