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Monitoring Perfusion Index in Patients Presenting to the Emergency Department Due to Drug Use.

(1) Background: The perfusion index (PI) represents the ratio between pulsatile blood flow and non-pulsatile blood flow in the peripheral tissue. (2) We aimed to investigate the blood pressure perfusion of tissues and organs in ethnobotanical, synthetic cannabinoid and cannabis derivative consumers through the value of perfusion index. (3) Results: The patients enrolled were divided into two groups: group A, which included all patients who presented in the ED within the first three hours after consumption, and group B, which included those patients who presented more than three hours and up to 12 h after drug consumption. The average values of the PI in the case of group A/group B were 1.51 ± 1.07/4.55 ± 3.66. Statistically significant correlations in both groups were recorded between the drug intake ED admission, respiratory rate, peripheral blood oxygen saturation and tissue perfusion index ( p < 0.001). The average value of the PI measured in group A was significantly lower compared to that measured in patients in group B. Therefore, we concluded that the perfusion of peripheral organs and tissues was lower in the first 3 h after drug administration. (4) Conclusions: PI plays an important role in the early detection of impaired organ perfusion and in monitoring tissue hypoxia. A decreased PI value may be an early indication of decreased perfusion organ damage.

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