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Quadriceps Tendon Ruptures in Middle-Aged to Older Patients: A Retrospective Study on the Preoperative MRI Injury Patterns and Mid-Term Patient-Reported Outcome Measures.

(1) Quadriceps tendon rupture (QTR) is a rare pathology, usually occurring in elderly patients with comorbidities, requiring surgical therapy. The aim of this study was to analyze rupture patterns and concomitant injuries using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) a nd to evaluate patient-reported outcome measures. (2) In this retrospective cross-sectional study, 113 patients with QTR were screened and rupture patterns/concomitant injuries ( n = 33) were analyzed via MRI. Clinical outcome was assessed in 45 patients using the International Knee Documentation (IKDC) and Lysholm score with a mean follow-up of 7.2 (±5.0) years. (3) The evaluation of preoperative MRIs showed multiple ruptures of subtendons in 67% with concomitant knee injuries in 45%. The most common associated pathology detected using MRI was pre-existing tendinosis (31.2%). Surgical refixation demonstrated good results with a mean post-operative IKDC score of 73.1 (±14.1) and mean Lysholm score of 84.2 (±16.1). Patient characteristics and individual radiologic rupture patterns did not significantly affect the clinical outcome of patients. (4) Acute QTRs are complex injuries with common involvement of multiple subtendons. MRI imaging can be useful for achieving an accurate diagnosis as pre-existing tendinosis as well as concomitant injuries are common, and might be useful for providing an individual surgical strategy and improving outcomes.

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