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ALBUMINURIA, DISEASE DURATION AND GLYCATED HEMOGLOBIN ARE RELATED WITH BONE MINERAL DENSITY IN TYPE 1 DIABETES: A CROSS-SECTIONAL STUDY.

Endocrine Practice 2023 Februrary 23
OBJECTIVE: Studies have found a significant decrease in bone mineral density (BMD) in individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) compared to healthy controls. Factors associated with this phenomenon have yet to be defined; therefore, this study aimed to explore the association of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), disease duration, albuminuria, and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) with BMD in adults with T1D.

METHODS: Cross-sectional study carried out in tertiary care. BMD analysis was performed by dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Linear models were constructed considering variables associated with BMD. Approval from the Ethics Committees and informed consent were obtained.

RESULTS: We included 128 participants, 59% women, 16% with menopause. The median age was 33 (26-42) years. The average age of diabetes diagnosis was 15.3 ± 6.3 years, and the median disease duration was 19.5 (12-27) years. In the adjusted analysis, higher albuminuria (p<0.01) and disease duration (p<0.05) were associated with a lower BMD in the femoral neck and total hip, independently of age, sex, and body mass index (BMI). Higher HbA1c (p<0.01) was associated with a lower spine BMD after adjustment for age, sex, and BMI.

CONCLUSION: Studied factors specific to T1D, including albuminuria, disease duration, and HbA1c have an association with BMD regardless of BMI, age, and sex.

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