Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Bioinformatics investigation on blood-based gene expressions of Alzheimer's disease revealed ORAI2 gene biomarker susceptibility: An explainable artificial intelligence-based approach.

Metabolic Brain Disease 2023 Februrary 22
The progressive, chronic nature of Alzheimer's disease (AD), a form of dementia, defaces the adulthood of elderly individuals. The pathogenesis of the condition is primarily unascertained, turning the treatment efficacy more arduous. Therefore, understanding the genetic etiology of AD is essential to identifying targeted therapeutics. This study aimed to use machine-learning techniques of expressed genes in patients with AD to identify potential biomarkers that can be used for future therapy. The dataset is accessed from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database (Accession Number: GSE36980). The subgroups (AD blood samples from frontal, hippocampal, and temporal regions) are individually investigated against non-AD models. Prioritized gene cluster analyses are conducted with the STRING database. The candidate gene biomarkers were trained with various supervised machine-learning (ML) classification algorithms. The interpretation of the model prediction is perpetrated with explainable artificial intelligence (AI) techniques. This experiment revealed 34, 60, and 28 genes as target biomarkers of AD mapped from the frontal, hippocampal, and temporal regions. It is identified ORAI2 as a shared biomarker in all three areas strongly associated with AD's progression. The pathway analysis showed that STIM1 and TRPC3 are strongly associated with ORAI2. We found three hub genes, TPI1, STIM1, and TRPC3, in the network of the ORAI2 gene that might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of AD. Naive Bayes classified the samples of different groups by fivefold cross-validation with 100% accuracy. AI and ML are promising tools in identifying disease-associated genes that will advance the field of targeted therapeutics against genetic diseases.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app