JOURNAL ARTICLE
REVIEW
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical considerations of anatomy and magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric meniscus tear, with imaging-based treatment options.

BACKGROUND: The incidence of meniscal tears in children has been increasing. Early sport specialization, more intense training activity, and increasing participation in competitive sports may have affected to that increasing trend. Diagnosing acute menisci tear in children is based on suggestive clinical and magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are special particulars in immature menisci, due to relatively good vascular supply. Furthermore, growing skeleton makes differences in injury pattern, and a clinician needs to recognize not only meniscus but also potential injuries in growth plates and ligaments, which are usual in connection with pediatric meniscus leasion. Clinical and imaging investigation prior to treatment is crucial, because non-operative care is considerable, to achieve spontaneous healing, especially in peripherial tears of younger children. Second, repair is preferred always as possible, in spite of resection due to high rate of long-term sequelae after partial meniscectomy. High standard preoperative imaging aid in preparing to the meniscus sparing arthroscopic intervention.

METHODS: In this current concept article, the clinical considerations of imaging the injured pediatric knee with a suspected meniscus tear and the treatment options by the imaging findings are reviewed.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: level III.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app