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What is the effect of the interventions for reducing sedentary behaviour in people with stroke? A Cochrane Review summary with commentary.

NeuroRehabilitation 2023 Februrary 2
BACKGROUND: Many stroke survivors are both sedentary and physically inactive, even those who have adequate mobility. This increases cardiometabolic risk and has impacts on physical and other functions.

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this Cochrane Review summary is to discuss from a rehabilitation perspective the results of the Cochrane review investigating the effects of the interventions designed to reduce sedentary behavior after stroke on mortality, secondary vascular events, cardiovascular risk, adverse events and sedentary behavior.

METHODS: The review authors searched for randomized controlled trials that had been published up to December 2019, comparing the effects of the interventions aimed to reduce sedentary behavior in patients after stroke with usual care, no intervention, sham intervention.

RESULTS: The results of the review showed that the interventions included did not affect the number of deaths or the incidence of recurrent cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events, falls or other adverse events in stroke patients. Evidence for their impact on sedentary behavior is currently inconclusive.

CONCLUSIONS: The evidence about reducing sedentary behavior in patients after stroke is incomplete, since research in this field is relatively new. Practitioners may also encourage reduction in sitting during daytime by considering interventions for other therapeutic targets (e.g. increasing physical activity and mobility), besides the studied interventions that proved to be safe and harmless.

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