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Relationship Between Worst Pattern of Invasion and Extranodal Extension in Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinomas.

Head and Neck Pathology 2023 Februrary 2
BACKGROUND: Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) is a common malignancy of the oral cavity with poor survival rates. The aim of this project is to investigate the relationship between certain histopathological factors such as Worst Pattern of Invasion (WPOI) and Extranodal Extension (ENE) in patients with oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) who underwent surgical resection at Loyola University Medical Center.

METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort study at a tertiary care academic medical center. All patients that underwent primary surgical resection of OTSCC between 1/1/2015 and 1/1/2022 were reviewed. Patients were identified using the Cerner CoPath Laboratory Information System.

RESULTS: A total of 82 patients met inclusion criteria and were included in the study. Higher grades of WPOI (WPOI 5) were not significantly associated with the presence of ENE in our study (P = 0.82), regardless of the presence of major or minor ENE. WPOI 5 was associated with a higher incidence of local recurrence (P = 0.011).

CONCLUSIONS: Higher grades of WPOI were not found to correlate with the presence of ENE, a common histopathological factor that is used as an important prognostic indicator in OTSCC. It is important for clinicians to consider these factors separately when determining whether a patient is high-risk and would benefit from aggressive multimodal treatment.

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