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Decrease in Mortality from Sepsis: Impact of the Multidisciplinary Program for the Hematologic Patient at Very High Risk.

A program for the hematologic patient at very high risk of infections (HAR, from its initials in Spanish) was implemented, based on a multidisciplinary team and six measures intended to reduce the colonization and subsequent sepsis by multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO). We aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of the HAR program in terms of MDRO infections mainly caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase-producing and multidrug-resistant Pseudomona aeruginosa , and sepsis-related mortality. We established retrospective comparisons between the pre-HAR period (2016-2018) and the post-HAR period (2018-2019), in patients who received a hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) and/or intensive chemotherapy to treat non-M3 acute myeloid leukemia (CH-AML). We included 262 patients: 176 pre-HAR and 86 post-HAR. MDRO infection was 4.6% at 30 days and 6.1% at 90 days (all the cases during the pre-HAR period). Sepsis-related mortality was 6.5%, considering a median follow-up of 608 days: 6.1% in the HSCT group and 12.4% in the CH-AML group ( p  = 0.306). Sepsis-related mortality was 8.7% in the pre-HAR period and 0% in the post-HAR period ( p  = 0.014). The implementation of this multidisciplinary program based in preventive measures and the appropriate use of antibiotics enabled a decrease in sepsis-related mortality in very high-risk hematologic patients.

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