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Role of Klotho Protein in Neuropsychiatric Disorders: A Narrative Review.

Neuropsychiatric disorders are comprised of diseases having both the neurological and psychiatric manifestations. The increasing burden of the disease on the population worldwide makes it necessary to adopt measures to decrease the prevalence. The Klotho is a single pass transmembrane protein that decreases with age, has been associated with various pathological diseases, like reduced bone mineral density, cardiac problems and cognitive impairment. However, multiple studies have explored its role in different neuropsychiatric disorders. A comprehensive search was undertaken in the Pubmed database for articles with the keywords "Klotho" and "neuropsychiatric disorders". The available literature, based on the above search strategy, has been compiled in this brief narrative review to describe the emerging role of Klotho in various neuropsychiatric disorders. The Klotho levels were decreased in various neuropsychiatric disorders except for bipolar disorder. A suppressed Klotho protein levels induced oxidative stress and incited pro-inflammatory conditions significantly contributing to the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorder. The increasing evidence of altered Klotho protein levels in cognition-decrement-related disorders warrants its consideration as a biomarker in various neuropsychiatric diseases. However, further evidence is required to understand its role as a therapeutic target.

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