Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Conjoint fascial sheath suspension with levator muscle advancement for severe blepharoptosis.

In patients with severe blepharoptosis, the function of the levator muscle is usually weak. Even if a large amount of levator is resected, under-correction and recurrence often occur postoperatively. Frontalis suspension is the first choice for severe ptosis; however, the external orbital lifting force of the frontalis causes non-physiological eyelid movement. Conjoint fascial sheath (CFS) is a fibrous tissue which can provide dynamic movement of upper eyelids and has been applied for the treatment of mild and moderate blepharoptosis in recent years. This study aims to assess the efficacy and safety of CFS suspension combined with levator muscle advancement for treating severe blepharoptosis. A retrospective study included 44 patients (60 eyelids) with severe ptosis who underwent the modified technique. Preoperatively, levator muscle function and margin reflex distance 1 (MRD1) were measured. Surgical outcomes, symmetry results and complications were evaluated postoperatively. At the 12-18 months follow-up, adequate or normal correction was achieved in 56 eyelids (93.3%), and 37 patients (84.1%) presented good or fair symmetry results. The most common complication was conjunctival prolapse, which was observed in six eyelids (10.0%), followed by lid fold deformity and under-correction. No exposure keratitis was recorded. In conclusion, the modified technique can physically elevate the eyelid with limited tissue injury and is effective for the correction of severe ptosis. Both satisfactory functional and esthetic results were achieved, and severe complications (such as exposure keratitis) were not observed.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app