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CO 2 enterography in endoscopic retrograde cholangiography using double-balloon endoscopy: randomized clinical trial.

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (DBERC) is a valuable procedure for patients with altered gastrointestinal anatomy. Nonetheless, it is time-consuming and burdensome for both patients and endoscopists, partly because route selection in the reconstructed bowel with complicating loop is challenging. Carbon dioxide insufflation enterography is reportedly useful for route selection in the blind loop. This prospective randomized clinical trial investigated the usefulness of carbon dioxide insufflation enterography for route selection by comparing it with conventional observation.

METHODS: Patients scheduled to undergo DBERC were consecutively registered. They were divided into carbon dioxide insufflation enterography and conventional groups via randomization according to stratification factors, type of reconstruction methods, and experience with double-balloon endoscopic retrograde cholangiography. The primary endpoint was the correct rate of initial route selection. The secondary endpoints were the insertion time, examination time, amount of anesthesia drugs, and complications.

RESULTS: The correct rate of route selection was significantly higher in the carbon dioxide insufflation enterography group (23/25, 92%) than in the visual method (15/25, 60%) (P=0.018). The insertion time was significantly shorter in the carbon dioxide insufflation enterography group than in the visual group (10.8±11.1 min vs. 29.8±15.7 min; P<0.001). No significant differences in complications were noted between the two groups. The amounts of sedatives and analgesics used were significantly lower in the carbon dioxide insufflation enterography group (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively).

CONCLUSIONS: Carbon dioxide insufflation enterography can reduce the burden of DBERC on patients and endoscopists by shortening the examination time and reducing the amount of medication.

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