ENGLISH ABSTRACT
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Stevens-Johnson syndrome and Lyell syndrome are severe bullous drug reactions that can be life-threatening. The aim of this study is to describe the epidemiological, etiological, clinical, therapeutic and evolutionary data of patients hospitalized in our Dermatology Department. This is a retrospective descriptive study over a period of 10 years. All records of patients admitted to the Dermatology Department for these cutaneous adverse drug reactions were included. A total of 30 patients were recorded, with a male predominance. There were 18 cases of Lyell syndrome, 8 cases of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and 4 cases of overlap syndrome. The mean time to onset after drug administration was 7.5 days. The average skin area detached was 48%. Visceral involvement was frequently observed: pulmonary involvement, renal involvement, hepatic cytolysis and hematological involvement. The notion of medication was found in all our patients, with self-medication in 23% of cases. The reason for prescription was dominated by post-surgical anticonvulsant prophylaxis. All our patients received symptomatic treatment, and corticosteroid therapy was administered in only one patient for macrophagic activation syndrome. The mortality rate was of 17%. Skin area involved, presence of renal failure or respiratory distress were the main prognostic factors.

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